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Classical vs. Electronic

Classical vs. Electronic

29-01-2013 | 10.18

Classical music, oh well. As a man in his twenties, I sometimes feel like a fish out of water when I go to see a performance at the Concertgebouw. Maybe it’s because I’m almost always looking at grey hairs. Such a shame! Is it really that stereotypical? Do young people really continue to stay away from classical acoustic music and listen to electronica?

I personally think that everyone deep down has a love for classical music. To be frank: it’s actually quite hard to dislike the iconic works of, say a Beethoven, Mozart, Bach, Vivaldi or a Händel. But for some bizarre reason, the worlds of classical music and electronic music don’t seem be entwined, but very far apart from each other. Each year I look forward to innovative projects and special live-acts that combine the classical and electronic aspects in order to create something unique. My thoughs go straight to projects such as Pantha Du Prince & The Bell Laboratory, the new album of Henrik Schwarz & Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra or the Carl Craig / Moritz von Oswald / Francesco Tristiano trio. Watching the video of Jeff Mills and the Montpellier Philharmonic Orchestra playing the Wizard’s oeuvre including The Bells in front of thousands of people always gives me goosebumps.

The Berlin originated Yellow Lounge is also a project that fits these exact descriptors. The line-up on February the 7th is full of heavy-hitters: Alisa Weilerstein, Daniel Hope and our resident Patrice Bäumel. Daniel Hope is a British violinist who played at previous editions of Yellow Lounge in Berlin at Cookies and Berghain. Sure, he does play his fair bit of traditional pieces by a.o. Schubert, but he is more into modern classical music. Two of my favorite composers - Philip Glass and Max Richter - that aren't afraid to loop and phase pieces of music, use someone else's work and able to minimalize music into something so beautiful, are on the man's repertoire. The best example is Philip Glass - the 75-year old Einstein on the Beach legend that worked together with artists such as Nosaj Thing and Pantha Du Prince for his Reworks CD. Whenever these two worlds come together, something innovative always seems to be the outcome.

Even if you’re not that well known with classical music, I hope that I sparked a flame within you to come to Yellow Lounge in Trouw on the 7th of February. Trust me; you won’t be disappointed.

Text: Frans Bootsman